SDI-12 + GPS USB adapter

After a final revision, I am happy to release the SDI-12 GPS USB adapter! This adapter is the latest one to add to the line of SDI-12 USB adapters. In August 2015, I released my first SDI-12 USB adapter with this post. It was an idea that I thought about while traveling. I was working on data logger designs that use SDI-12 sensors and felt that interacting with SDI-12 sensors is not easy for agricultural or water resource researchers. Having an adapter that connects a computer to an SDI-12 sensor and reads measurements directly from the sensor would be very useful. So I made the adapter to simplify lab tests and data logger deployments. Since then, I’ve written free Python scripts for basic data logging (read the SDI-12 USB adapter main page). The demand for the adapter since then has been high enough to support my continued update on the data logging script, expanding from PC/Mac/Linux to single-board computers such as Raspberry Pi and Beagle Bone Bone. I have also expanded the adapter with an SDI-12 + Analog USB adapter that includes four high-precision analog inputs.

Later I found some need to add GPS modules to the existing SDI-12 USB adapter so that mobile data loggers such as those mounted on tractors will be able to produce with Geo-tagged data that can be made into maps. After some initial struggle using the new ATMEGA328PB processor that sports two hardware serial ports (one to talk to PC and the other with GPS), I realized that the GPS module actually interfered with the processor and caused program freeze-up. Then I made some hardware revisions and was able to prevent interference. It turned out that the new ATMEGA328PB processor that I used in my initial prototype was especially susceptible to interference when I used its second hardware serial port that have the same pins as the SPI pins that program the processor. So I switched to the ATMEGA1284P processor that I have been using on my open source physics laboratory design.

After extensive tests, I am happy to add this adapter to the product line. You can purchase (small quantity at the moment) at inmojo.com or on my blog (in the middle of the page). The adapter requires a separate purchase of the GPS module that Adafruit makes and sells, the Ultimate GPS module part number 746. You only need to solder four pins on the GPS module, the TX, RX, GND, and VIN, and the same pins on the adapter. Since the GPS module is relatively expensive, I can’t stock them up. But if you really need it assembled, you may have a GPS unit sent to me and a few extra dollars for assembly and testing. Just contact me once you make a purchase if you want assembly.

Adding Beagle bone to the mix

I was recently contacted by someone who was interested in using the SDI-12 USB adapter on a Beagle Bone Black single board computer. I’ve never used a Beagle Boards but I know that they are ARM-based computers running linux thus should operate similarly to the Raspberry pi boards that I’ve been playing since 2012. So I took the dive and got a Beagle Bone Black from MCM electronics and gave it a try. Right out of the box the board boots into a version of Linux. I was able to test its connectivity with the SDI-12 USB adapter successfully using the “screen” command. Later I ran a simple Python script under Python 2.7 and got very nice results:

There are a few differences that I noticed while exploring BBB:

  1. There is a “serial” module included in Python that is not available on other platforms, such as windows, linux, Mac OS, or Raspberry pi. It functions like the pyserial module used on all these systems.
  2. The board boots much faster than raspberry pi 3B, maybe in 15 seconds. RPI 3B takes about 30 seconds. This is a good thing.
  3. There are a lot fewer instructions on basic operations for Beagle boards than Raspberry pi, which was the primary reason I got my raspberry pi B instead of Beagle board back in 2012.

When I have more time, I will test my open-source python data logger on BBB to make sure it works just as it does on all other systems. For now, one more box is checked: “compatible with Beagle Bone Black”.

 

SDi-12 + GPS USB adapter test

I was able to perform some tests on the new SDI-12 + GPS USB adapter. I don’t have the GPS module but do have an arduino shield that features the same GolbalTol GPS module so I used some jumper wires to connect the GPS to the adapter. I did tests last night and overnight. Things are looking good. Here are some results:

Commands:

To get longitude and latitude, you will issue “zM!”. The return values are z(long)(lat)\r\n. The longitude and latitude are both in standard NMEA format of 100*(degree.minute). For instance, a longitude of -9412.3411 means -(94 degrees 12.3411 minutes).

To get day, month, and year, you will issue “zM1!”. The return value is again in standard NMEA format of +DDMMYY. For example, a date of +190317 means the 19th of March, 2017.

To get hour, minute, and second, you will issue “zM2!”. The return value is also in standard NMEA format of +hhmmss. For example, a time of +123507 means 12:35:07 in 24hr style so it is 12:35:07 PM for those that use 12hr style.

Sample commands (in red) and returns (in green):

Single-sensor measurement:

zM!
z0012
z
zD0!
z-09456.1234+4578.9012
zM1!
z0011
z
zD0!
z+190317
zM2!
z0011
z
zD0!
z+065402

Concurrent measurement:

zC!
z00102
zD0!
z-09456.1234+4578.9012
zC1!
z00101
zD0!
z+190317
zC2!
z00101
zD0!
z+065713

SDI-12 + GPS module

After some development, I am glad to show a prototype of an SDI-12 + GPS USB module. This module incorporates the following features:

  1. USB connection
  2. SDI-12 translator with 4 SDI-12 connections (on a single SDI-12 bus)
  3. Header for a GPS module
  4. External power connection for sensors that need more than 5V from USB
  5. External power/5V USB selection jumper
  6. You can also use other serial devices or sensors such as Maxbotix serial sonic ranger, with some modification to the firmware
  7. Both SDI-12 senors and GPS are addressed like SDI-12 sensors, for easy integration of GPS signal into your existing SDI-12 logging scripts

Here is a picture:

I ran out of GPS modules. New ones are on the way. Once I get them, I’ll solder one on an adapter and do a demo video.

Phi-panel circuit board update

Recent comments from customers interested in phi-panels have convinced me that going from the original buttons with black plungers to low-profile metal buttons was a bad idea. On my end, the low-profile buttons on the front side of the board required me to reflow both sides of the boards, something that takes a lot of time and extra effort.

So I have made a recent priority update to the phi-panels, both 20X4 and 16X2, to use the original buttons with black plungers again. I’ll be building these boards soon and post some photos.

From now on, all kits will have pre-built components on the back side. All you need to solder are:

  • Buttons
  • LEDs and their resistors
  • Connector for serial port
  • LCD
  • Buzzer

If you buy assembled version, as always, everything is assembled and ready to go.

Here is the back side of the kit board, with key components already reflow-soldered on:

Here is front side of the kit board, just a blank board:

 

Here is assembled unit, same as before:

Here is assembled unit’s back side:

I2C LCDs

There are many types of I2C character LCDs on the hobby electronics market. To design my new open source data loggers and Phi-3 Arduino shield, I decided to move away from the bare parallel HD44780 character LCDs and go with character LCDs and I2C backpacks (aka I2C LCDs). I found out a few popular designs and thought that I would summarize them for your convenience.

Most I2C LCDs are based on the following two ICs, all of which are I2C I/O (port) expanders:

  • PCF8574 or PCF8574A
  • MCP23008

Hardware:

Both ICs have 8 I/O pins. MCP23008 is more versatile but that is irrelevant to simple applications in LCDs.

Adafruit designed an I2C LCD backpack and Arduino LCD shields based on MCP23008. There are compatible devices sold on ebay. I can’t tell without seeing the sample code to decide whether an ebay seller is actually selling a compatible product. But if you do want to get one on ebay, make sure you find their library code and confirm that the library contains Adafruit’s names. Libraries you find from ebay sellers are likely out of date though. One good thing is that the compatible ones are very likely using the same pin assignments as Adafruit’s so it’s easy to get it to work once you get the library installed.

FM (Francisco Malpartida) designed an I2C LCD backpack based on PCF8574. There are lots of compatible devices sold on ebay and they don’t have the same pin assignments! This creates issues when you are making purchases thinking that they have certain pin assignments. The pin assignments refer to which PCF8574 pin is connected to which HD44780 display pin. Also the I2C addresses are all different. I don’t mean one might have an address of 0x3F and another might have 0x3E. What I mean is that one might have 0x3F and another one may be 0x20. There is no way to set one display that has address 0x20 to address 0x3F! PCF8574 has address space of 0x20 to 0x27. PCF8574A has address space of 0x38-0x3F. Most common addresses I’ve seen are 0x20, 0x27, and 0x3F, with the latter two sharing pin assignments that are different from the ones with 0x20 address. Most of these displays allow you to cut traces or solder pads to change addresses. Why would you if you don’t have multiple LCDs?

Software:

Adafruit has its own library Adafruit_LiquidCrystal. This library is decent. It can take different pin assignments as parameters. On the other hand, it is a different library than Arduino’s included LiquidCrystal library. So code you wrote for LiquidCrystal library may need some change when you switch to an Adafruit compatible I2C LCD.

FM wrote a library New LiquidCrystal. This library is pretty good. You can use a number of different LCDs including parallel HD44780 LCDs, I2C LCDs using PCF8574, LCDs using shift registers etc. A nice feature is that there is a base class LCD so regardless what actual type of LCD you are using, as long as it’s supported by this library, it works the same way on the software level as another supported LCD.

Since not all PCF8574/74A I2C lcds have the same pin assignment, or even back light polarity, using the correct definition will be crucial. I found the following three definitions. Each seems to work with the particular I2C address, although there is no relation between I2C address and how the pins are assigned (by circuit designer):

The first two work on backpacks that look like this:

Notice that only the address is different. Pin assignments and back light polarity are all the same.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x3F, 2, 1, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, POSITIVE); // Blue potentiometer with back light jumper.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x27, 2, 1, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, POSITIVE); // Blue potentiometer with back light jumper.

The last definition works on backpacks that look like this:

Notice that pins are very different and back light polarity is negative.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x20, 4, 5, 6, 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, NEGATIVE); // Tiny mental potentiometer no back light jumper.

Detection:

In case you can’t determine the address or pin out, say none of the above definitions work, but you’re sure the IC is PCF8574/74A, you should first scan the I2C bus for the address, and then use your meter to map out the pin assignments, and then use your definition. The lcd constructor has the following parameters: lcd(add, En, Rw, Rs, d4, d5, d6, d7, Bl, Pol).

Here is the I2C scanner I use by Tod E. Kurt:

https://github.com/todbot/arduino-i2c-scanner/

 

Open source data logger videos

Open source data logger videos:

Quick demo:

Features introduction 1,2,3

Assembling the logger

 

Phi-3 shield videos

Here is a video of me navigating through the alarm clock program’s menu:

Here is a video of me explaining the components of the shield:

Here is a video of me explaining the different kits you can buy:

OK one more assembling modules on the shield:

Teaser photo

What can this new board do?

2016-11-22-11-08-48

Guesses? Comments? Answer revealed after US Thanksgiving holiday (2016-11-24)!

(There is nothing on the back side)

Read analog sensors on SDI-12 USB + Analog adapter

Reading analog sensors are easy. The adapter has SDI-12 address of ‘z’, lower case. So reading the analog sensor just involves querying the SDI-12 address ‘z’. There are two sensing modes: single-ended, and differential. If you have mixed single-ended and  differential channels, read single-ended, then differential. Discard channels you don’t need. It won’t hurt the sensors or the adapter if you wire them in differential mode but read in single-ended mode. The reverse is also true.

The sensing commands are ‘zM!’ for single-ended readings, and ‘zM1!’ for differential readings.

In both modes, you use ‘zD01!’ zee-Dee-zero-!, to get data. Essentially, the adapter itself is an SDI-12 sensor that reports 2 or 4 values, depending on sensing mode. This makes it very easy to integrate analog sensors into your existing data logger that is based on the original SDI-12 USB adapter. It is still advantageous to keep the original SDI-12 USB adapter so it can split SDI-12 sensors with the SDI-12 + Analog adapter. In case one SDI-12 sensor gets broken and interferes with the rest of the sensors on that adapter, the SDI-12 sensors on the other adapter will be unaffected.

To make this complete, the SDI-12 USB + Analog adapter also responds to the following commands:

Command:’z!’

Response: ‘z\r\n’ This means that the adapter is responding to queries.

Command: ‘z!’

Response: ‘z13Liudr   SDITRD130\r\n’ This indicates that the firmware is in version 1.3.0.

Command: ‘zM!’

Response: ‘z0014\r\nz\r\n’ This means that the adapter needs 1 second to acquire 4 single-ended auto-scale analog values. The second ‘z’ indicates it completed the acquisition.

Command: ‘zM1!’

Response: ‘z0012\r\nz\r\n’ This means that the adapter needs 1 second to acquire 2 differential auto-scale analog values. The second ‘z’ indicates it completed the acquisition.

C0mmand: ‘zD0!’

Response: ‘z+1.23456+2.34567+3.45678+4.56789\r\n’ or ‘z+1.23456+2.34567\r\n’ These are single-ended or differential channel readings, depending on whether M or M1 was issued before D0.

 

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