Phi-shield revised and released

phi-3-shield-on-in-hand

It has been a while since I gave the phi-shield a major revision. I’ve been working on this for a while and now I am releasing the Phi-3 shield. This shield continues to support user interaction with LCDs and buttons. Here is a list of the features:

The following hardware are provided by the shield:

  • 20X4 LCD with back light on/off control
  • Six buttons (up/down/left/right/B/A)
  • Two LED indicators
  • Speaker
  • MicroSD card slot
  • Real-time clock (DS3231)
  • EEPROM (32KB 24LC256)
  • Connector for Adafruit Ultimate GPS module or Bluetooth module
  • Stacking headers for easy access to all pins.
  • Recessed board right edge for easy access to MEGA’s 18X2 pin headers on the right side.
  • Reset button

phi-3-shield-lcd-side-by-side

The following software functions are provided by various supporting libraries:

  • User-selectable menu (LCD + buttons)
  • Number and text entry (LCD + buttons)
  • Scrollable long text (LCD + buttons)
  • Date and time (DS3231 or GPS)
  • Location (GPS)
  • Data and configuration storage (MicroSD card and EEPROM)
  • Playing simple tones (speaker)
  • Indicators (LEDs)
  • Wireless connection (Bluetooth module)

phi-3-shield-lcd-removed-annotated

There are three tiers of Phi-3 shield kits: kit0, kit1, and kit2, none of which includes a GPS module. The kits are immediately available. Buttons with color caps as pictured will be included while supplies last.

Here is the Phi-3 shield’s own page. There are links on the page to make purchases. Or you can visit the BUY page to see what stores carry this shield.

Phi-3 shield

Video demonstrations will be available next week. Meanwhile, the support of Phi-2 shield will remain. If you need Phi-2 shields, I have them available.

phi-3-shield-bottom-rtc-lcd-wire-removed

Python code for multiple SDI-12 sensors

As you probably know, the SDI-12 sensor logger code in Python can only log one sensor at a time. It is not a hardware limitation. I wrote the logger code as an example of how to do logging with the SDI-12 adapters and Python. To make sure people don’t have the wrong ideas that you can ONLY get one sensor logged, I have been working on the logger code for the past couple of days and have increased the number of sensors from one to any number you need. The improvement is backward compatible with the configuration file for Raspberry Pi logging, in case you wonder. All that is changed to the user interface is the prompt:

Original prompt:

‘SDI-12 sensor address: (0-9, A-Z, a-z)’

New prompt:

‘Enter all SDI-12 sensor addresses, such as 1234:’

 

So if you have 4 sensors you want to log together, then just enter all their addresses in a string, such as 1234 and hit enter. All sensor inputs will be saved to log file and sent to sparkfun’s data server. The only limitation on the code now is the sparkfun data server stream. The server stream is set up to only take 6 values so the logger code will send the first 6 values from all sensors to the server. If you wish to lift this limitation, you should create your own stream and set up as many values per data point as you need, and modify the logger code (see the magic number 6?).

Below are some sample data logs:

2/3/2017  12:15:25 AM 1 1.11 26 z 5.09419 5.09381 0.24388 5.09419
2/3/2017  12:15:56 AM 1 1.11 26 z 5.09325 5.0925 0.24388 5.09306
2/3/2017  12:16:28 AM 1 1.11 26 z 5.09363 5.094 0.24375 5.09438
2/3/2017  12:17:02 AM 1 1.11 26 z 5.09194 5.09269 0.24375 5.09306

As you can see, the data are separated by sensor address. The address z is the analog-to-digital converter’s address for SDI-12 + Analog adapter. As you can see, my computer outputs 5.09V instead of the nominal 5V on its USB port.

Here is a link to the new logger code. Give it a try and let me know how you like it.

sdi_12_logger_v1_4_1.py

Teaser photo

What can this new board do?

2016-11-22-11-08-48

Guesses? Comments? Answer revealed after US Thanksgiving holiday (2016-11-24)!

(There is nothing on the back side)

Read analog sensors on SDI-12 USB + Analog adapter

Reading analog sensors are easy. The adapter has SDI-12 address of ‘z’, lower case. So reading the analog sensor just involves querying the SDI-12 address ‘z’. There are two sensing modes: single-ended, and differential. If you have mixed single-ended and  differential channels, read single-ended, then differential. Discard channels you don’t need. It won’t hurt the sensors or the adapter if you wire them in differential mode but read in single-ended mode. The reverse is also true.

The sensing commands are ‘zM!’ for single-ended readings, and ‘zM1!’ for differential readings.

In both modes, you use ‘zD01!’ zee-Dee-zero-!, to get data. Essentially, the adapter itself is an SDI-12 sensor that reports 2 or 4 values, depending on sensing mode. This makes it very easy to integrate analog sensors into your existing data logger that is based on the original SDI-12 USB adapter. It is still advantageous to keep the original SDI-12 USB adapter so it can split SDI-12 sensors with the SDI-12 + Analog adapter. In case one SDI-12 sensor gets broken and interferes with the rest of the sensors on that adapter, the SDI-12 sensors on the other adapter will be unaffected.

To make this complete, the SDI-12 USB + Analog adapter also responds to the following commands:

Command:’z!’

Response: ‘z\r\n’ This means that the adapter is responding to queries.

Command: ‘z!’

Response: ‘z13Liudr   SDITRD130\r\n’ This indicates that the firmware is in version 1.3.0.

Command: ‘zM!’

Response: ‘z0014\r\nz\r\n’ This means that the adapter needs 1 second to acquire 4 single-ended auto-scale analog values. The second ‘z’ indicates it completed the acquisition.

Command: ‘zM1!’

Response: ‘z0012\r\nz\r\n’ This means that the adapter needs 1 second to acquire 2 differential auto-scale analog values. The second ‘z’ indicates it completed the acquisition.

C0mmand: ‘zD0!’

Response: ‘z+1.23456+2.34567+3.45678+4.56789\r\n’ or ‘z+1.23456+2.34567\r\n’ These are single-ended or differential channel readings, depending on whether M or M1 was issued before D0.

 

Update on the SDI-12 + Analog USB adapter

sdi-12-usb-analog

Here is an update:

In case you wonder what all those green screw terminal blocks are doing, here is a graphical explanation:

Both the SDI-12 USB and SDI-12 + Analog USB are explained in this illustration.

To maintain the same compact size, I printed all the pin information on the bottom of the board again. So if you don’t know what a certain pin on a block does, just flip it around and you’ll see it. The jumper information is all on top side.

The SDI-12 + Analog USB adapter comes with a jumper to select either internal 5V or external voltage at the Ext. Power screw terminal block. You may connect a small 9V battery to the Ext. Power screw terminal block. You can also connect your  12V battery that powers your logger to this pin. The external power is only sent to the SDI-12 sensors. It’s not powering the adapter or sent to the analog inputs’ “+” connections. Those “++ connections are always from the 5V USB power. There are 3 pins on the terminal block and the center pin is not connected to anything. It makes it easier to separate the + and – of the external power and I don’t have to source 2-pole blocks besides 3-pole blocks.

All four SDI-12 blocks have “+ S -“. The “+” is either USB 5V or external power depending on the power jumper. “S” is SDI-12 signal. “-” is ground. All grounds should be connected together. These four blocks are all connected. They are not four separate buses. There is no way to transparently bridge one USB serial port to more than one SDI-12 bus. If you wish separate SDI-12 bus for each sensor, which is unnecessary, get a separate adapter for a separate SDI-12 bus. This need for separate SDI-12 bus may come from some suspicion that if a single SDI-12 sensor breaks, it may take the whole bus down with it. I have not been so unfortunate and broken SDI-12 sensors I have had didn’t affect good ones. In any case, a broken sensor needs replacement. Unless you deploy redundant sensors one set on each SDI-12 bus, you are OK with a single adapter that bridges a single SDI-12 bus for all sensors.

The four analog channels are as accurate as 0.02mV when the signal is small, below 0.256V. The adapter automatically uses the best scale to determine the signal. The highest signal allowed is 6.144V on any channel. There are 6 ranges (gain levels), with maximal ranges of 6.144V, 4.096V, 2.048V, 1.024V, 0.512V and 0.256V. Within each range of voltage, the analog input is turned into a numerical value between 0 and 32767. So if you have a signal that is 0.1V, using the largest range of 6.144V will give an smallest change of 0.1875mV. This sounds very accurate, because this change is 0.1% of the signal. But the real resolution of the ADC is not the smallest change. It is usually many times that. Plus there is fluctuation in supply voltage and noise in the signal. The result is likely in the neighborhood of 2mV. This becomes 2% of the signal magnitude. But if you use the 0.256V range, its smallest change is 0.0078125mV. The accuracy is about 0.02mV to be conservative. Since SDI-12 standard has no way to change scale, the adapter does it automatically.

The auto scale is done with a 10%~90% range. The adapter starts with the largest scale to protect the converter and reads the signal. It then calculates the smallest scale that will fit the signal within 10%-90% of the scale. It reads at this scale and returns the value. Each channel is auto scaled independently from the other channels so you may have some larger signals automatically read at a larger scale and smaller signals automatically read at a smaller scale.

The meaning of single-ended channel is that each one of the four channels is read against the common ground. This is less accurate for small signals over long wires. If you have a pyronometer or some other small voltage signal sensor, you may want to use two channels in differential mode. In this mode, the “+” wire is connected to say channel 0, and the “-” wire is connected to channel 1. The difference between these two are read and the difference may either be positive or negative. Range of the difference between these wires can be +-6.144, … +-0.256Vetc.

(to be continued)

 

SDI-12 USB + Analog prototype

So finally the boards and parts are here and I built the first batch of 3 boards (purple as in oshpark.com). Here is a photo of one of them with my hand as size reference:

2016-11-04-09-27-20

This board is twice the size of the original SDI-12 USB adapter and features the following additional features:

  1. 4 SDI-12 screw terminal blocks. The original adapter can handle multiple SDI-12 sensors if you wire them all together to the single SDI-12 block. On the other hand, I can make this easier by providing more connectors. 4 connections don’t mean limit of SDI-12 sensors to 4. You can wire any number of sensors to the same connection. More connections just mean more convenience when building your logger or swapping sensors in the field.
  2. External power supply block. With the original adapter, SDI-12 sensors are powered by 5V from USB. If it is not enough, you need another power source and some additional wiring. With the new version, just wire external power to this connection and select the SDI-12 power jumper to Ext., less wiring.
  3. Analog channels: Many users asked about using analog sensors that are NOT SDI-12 sensors. That requires additional hardware and distracts you from focusing on making your logger. Enter 4 analog channels! Each channel is capable of 16-bit analog to digital conversion and can have up to 16X gain. The smallest voltage you can read is down to 8 micro volts! You are welcome, pyranometers! You can use them as 4 single-ended channels, for PT1000 or other resistive temperature sensors or as 2 differential channels, best suited for pyranometers.
  4. Resistance sensors: resistance measurements are available on every analog channel. The channels come with select-able high-precision low-temperature-drift pull-up resistors. You can select 1K resistor for PT1000 and anything with low resistance or 10K resistor for 10K thermistors or anything with high resistance. If your sensor generates a voltage, such as pyranometer, you can disconnect the jumper to disable this pull-up resistor. Each channel is separately configurable and auto-scales for best precision.
  5. Analog channels are sensed the SAME way you would sensor an SDI-12 sensor. The address is ‘z’ (lower case). Just in case you wonder, there is also a differential mode to further increase precision of small signals if you pair channels 0 and 1 as a differential channel, or 2 and 3 as another differential channel. Send zM! to the adapter for single-ended measurements. Send zM1! for differential measurements. If you have them mixed, say channels 0-1 is used as differential for a pyranometer and 2, 3 are single-ended for two PT1000 temperature sensors, sense it twice, once as single-ended, discard values from channels 0 and 1. Then sense as differential, discard value from 2-3 differential.
  6. Every key component, such as the analog-to-digital converter IC, the ATMEGA328 processor, the FT232RL USB chip, crystal oscillator, fuse, and precision resistors, comes from reputable vendors such as digikey, mouser, or newark. Every adapter is assembled by myself and tested with an actual SDI-12 sensor (also an analog or resistive sensor). I don’t know how else to ensure excellent quality! There is no guarantee coming with ebay purchases!

I expect this product to be available in a few weeks after I conclude my testing phase. My estimate retail price is $89. I will release data logger code that can log both SDI-12 sensor and the analog channels when this is offered for sale.

SDI-12 eye candy! an SDI-12 + analog input USB adapter

The SDI-12 USB adapter is definitely a success! They are flying off the shelf! I guess people want to log data with PC/raspberry pi just as much as with Arduino (I have an SDI-12 data logging shield for Arduino). So I thought what else I can do to provide even better service to the community of SDI-12 sensor users.So here it is (well, just the design, actual device is not ready for prime time yet):

sdi-12-analog-usb-adapter

Here are the things that I added to make another version of the adapter:

  1. 4 SDI-12 screw terminal blocks. The original adapter can handle multiple SDI-12 sensors if you wire them all together to the single SDI-12 block. On the other hand, I can make this easier by providing more connectors. 4 connections don’t mean limit of SDI-12 sensors to 4. You can wire any number of sensors to the same connection. More connections just mean more convenience when building your logger.
  2. External power supply block. With the original adapter, SDI-12 sensors are powered by 5V from USB. If it is not enough, you need another power source and some additional wiring. With the new version, just wire external power to this connection and select the SDI-12 power jumper to Ext., less wiring.
  3. Analog channels: Many users asked about using analog sensors that are NOT SDI-12 sensors. That requires additional hardware and distracts you from focusing on making your logger. Enter 4 analog channels! Each channel is capable of 16-bit analog to digital conversion and can have up to 16X gain. The smallest voltage you can read is down to 8 micro volts! You are welcome, pyranometers!
  4. Resistance sensors: resistance measurements are available on every analog channel. The channels come with select-able high-precision low-temperature-drift pull-up resistors. You can select 1K resistor for PT1000 and anything with low resistance or 10K resistor for 10K thermistors or anything with high resistance. If your sensor generates a voltage, such as pyranometer, you can disconnect the jumper to disable this pull-up resistor. Each channel is separately configurable and auto-scales for best precision.
  5. Analog channels are sensed the SAME way you would sensor an SDI-12 sensor. The address is ‘z’ (lower case). Just in case you wonder, there is also a differential mode to further increase precision of small signals if you pair channels 0 and 1 as a differential channel, or 2 and 3 as another differential channel. A different command is used for differential channels also at address ‘z’ (lower case).
  6. Every key component, such as the analog-to-digital converter IC, the ATMEGA328 processor, the FT232RL USB chip, crystal oscillator, fuse, and precision resistors, comes from reputable vendors such as digikey, mouser, or newark. Every adapter is assembled by myself and tested with an actual SDI-12 sensor (also an analog or resistive sensor). I don’t know how else to ensure excellent quality! There is no guarantee coming with ebay purchases!

Important! This version will be named SDI-12 + Analog USB adapter and the original adapter will still be offered. The original adapter works great as part of a desktop/lab test device and for data loggers mostly made up of SDI-12 sensors. The new adapter is more expensive due to added capabilities.

Any comments? Suggestions? Please feel free to tell me.

SDI-12 bus scan code

In case you need to diagnose your SDI-12 data logger, I posted SDI-12 bus scan code for the SDI-12 USB adapter (in Python) and for the SDI-12 data logging shield (in C for Arduino). Their links are under Data logger programs or Downloads.

Here is a screen shot of the Python code:

bus-scanner

The Arduino code has a similar interface without the serial port select (you select Arduino serial port in Arduino serial monitor). It’s fun translating C code into Python. C is famous for manipulating strings as arrays of ASCII characters. Doing such in Python seems like a hassle because it has no pointer mechanism, loose types, and aims to handle Unicode so it buries the ASCII characters under layers of things. Anyway, each language has its own strengths and weaknesses.

Notice that the scanner shows a Decagon 5TM sensor at address ‘1’ and also shows the SDU-12 translator at address ‘z’. Make sure that each sensor already has a unique address before scanning the bus. To configure sensors with unique addresses, run the configuration code for either the SDI-12 USB adapter or the SDI-12 data logging shield. Hope this helps. Comments?

SDI-12 USB adapter manual updated

I have just finished an update to the SDI-12 USB adapter documentation.

Updates:

  1. I added a document to the manual: Sensor connection guide. It lists a number of SDI-12 and other sensor wiring information from various manufacturers. Find it in the SDI-12 USB adapter page under documentation.
  2. All sections are now numbered now for easy reference.
  3. Two new sensors have been tested by customers to work perfectly with the adapter: Campbell Scientific CS650 and CS655 soil sensors.
  4. I added an appendix to explain how to use external power for your SDI-12 sensors, in case they don’t work with the 5V power supplied by the SDI-12 USB adapter. A wiring diagram is included.
  5. I added an appendix to explain how to easily connect a Decagon SDI-12 sensor with a stereo plug with a picture.

SDI-12 USD adapter with external power SDI-12 USD adapter with stereo adapter

Soil data logger telemetry

I have finally found time to build a simple website for my soil data logger with telemetry. The system works as the following:

  1. The data logger consists of a raspberry pi and my SDI-12 USB adapter with a Decagon 5TM soil sensor
  2. The data logger runs the open-source datalogger code I wrote in Python to first get parameters from the user (COM port, SDI-12 address, delay etc.), and then collect data, save to a local .CSV file, and then send the same data to sparkfun’s phant server.
  3. I constructed a web interface to plot the data using Google Charts and download .CSV version from sparkfun’s phant server.

Here is a screen shot:

soil logger webpage

I’ve uploaded the webpage to a server with a link below. The sensor is apparently NOT buried in soil so I can easily take the setup and set it up in different places to test its stability.

Link to the website: Link

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