I2C LCDs

There are many types of I2C character LCDs on the hobby electronics market. To design my new open source data loggers and Phi-3 Arduino shield, I decided to move away from the bare parallel HD44780 character LCDs and go with character LCDs and I2C backpacks (aka I2C LCDs). I found out a few popular designs and thought that I would summarize them for your convenience.

Most I2C LCDs are based on the following two ICs, all of which are I2C I/O (port) expanders:

  • PCF8574 or PCF8574A
  • MCP23008

Hardware:

Both ICs have 8 I/O pins. MCP23008 is more versatile but that is irrelevant to simple applications in LCDs.

Adafruit designed an I2C LCD backpack and Arduino LCD shields based on MCP23008. There are compatible devices sold on ebay. I can’t tell without seeing the sample code to decide whether an ebay seller is actually selling a compatible product. But if you do want to get one on ebay, make sure you find their library code and confirm that the library contains Adafruit’s names. Libraries you find from ebay sellers are likely out of date though. One good thing is that the compatible ones are very likely using the same pin assignments as Adafruit’s so it’s easy to get it to work once you get the library installed.

FM (Francisco Malpartida) designed an I2C LCD backpack based on PCF8574. There are lots of compatible devices sold on ebay and they don’t have the same pin assignments! This creates issues when you are making purchases thinking that they have certain pin assignments. The pin assignments refer to which PCF8574 pin is connected to which HD44780 display pin. Also the I2C addresses are all different. I don’t mean one might have an address of 0x3F and another might have 0x3E. What I mean is that one might have 0x3F and another one may be 0x20. There is no way to set one display that has address 0x20 to address 0x3F! PCF8574 has address space of 0x20 to 0x27. PCF8574A has address space of 0x38-0x3F. Most common addresses I’ve seen are 0x20, 0x27, and 0x3F, with the latter two sharing pin assignments that are different from the ones with 0x20 address. Most of these displays allow you to cut traces or solder pads to change addresses. Why would you if you don’t have multiple LCDs?

Software:

Adafruit has its own library Adafruit_LiquidCrystal. This library is decent. It can take different pin assignments as parameters. On the other hand, it is a different library than Arduino’s included LiquidCrystal library. So code you wrote for LiquidCrystal library may need some change when you switch to an Adafruit compatible I2C LCD.

FM wrote a library New LiquidCrystal. This library is pretty good. You can use a number of different LCDs including parallel HD44780 LCDs, I2C LCDs using PCF8574, LCDs using shift registers etc. A nice feature is that there is a base class LCD so regardless what actual type of LCD you are using, as long as it’s supported by this library, it works the same way on the software level as another supported LCD.

Since not all PCF8574/74A I2C lcds have the same pin assignment, or even back light polarity, using the correct definition will be crucial. I found the following three definitions. Each seems to work with the particular I2C address, although there is no relation between I2C address and how the pins are assigned (by circuit designer):

The first two work on backpacks that look like this:

Notice that only the address is different. Pin assignments and back light polarity are all the same.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x3F, 2, 1, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, POSITIVE); // Blue potentiometer with back light jumper.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x27, 2, 1, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, POSITIVE); // Blue potentiometer with back light jumper.

The last definition works on backpacks that look like this:

Notice that pins are very different and back light polarity is negative.

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x20, 4, 5, 6, 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, NEGATIVE); // Tiny mental potentiometer no back light jumper.

Detection:

In case you can’t determine the address or pin out, say none of the above definitions work, but you’re sure the IC is PCF8574/74A, you should first scan the I2C bus for the address, and then use your meter to map out the pin assignments, and then use your definition. The lcd constructor has the following parameters: lcd(add, En, Rw, Rs, d4, d5, d6, d7, Bl, Pol).

Here is the I2C scanner I use by Tod E. Kurt:

https://github.com/todbot/arduino-i2c-scanner/

 

One Response to I2C LCDs

  1. carlos frondizi says:

    Dear Dr.
    thanks for this complete information
    We use here LCD I2C since they use so many less pins
    We have also three libraries and test which one Works.
    Normally one of the three Works.
    Not too scientific procudure.
    rgds and keep up the goood work.
    Carlos Frondizi

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