New Arduino shield – Phi-1

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

I have developed this shield in my spare time to make prototyping with Arduino much easier. The shield, when assembled, has one LCD monitor, 6 buttons, real time clock and battery backup for keeping time, EEPROM for data storage, GPS connector, buzzer, LED, and two RJ11 connectors for things you absolutely want secured against pull.

Here is a video of a 360 degree view of an assembled Phi-1 shield:

Just running a clock with DS1307 Real Time Clock (RTC) module

Running a testing routine to make sure everything works

Running a fully-functional alarm clock (it woke me up this morning) Details of making the alarm clock is on a separate post. The code is listed near the end of this post.

Morse encoder: type in a sentence and translate it into Morse code.

Function list:

  • 16X2 LCD character display
  • 6 push buttons –  four arranged in arrow keys and two more on the side
  • 2 RJ11 ports for long and robust connections with sensors or control devices
  • Optional buzzer and LED in place of the RJ11 ports
  • Real time clock with battery backup keeps the time when Arduino is turned off
  • EEPROM for easy data logging keeps data when Arduino is turned off. Use 24LC256 or compatible I2C EEPROM
  • GPS connector and breakout for this popular GPS module (http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=465)
  • Reset button for Arduino
  • All Arduino pins are brought out for maximal flexibility.
  • Hackable for more functionalities (see the end of the assembling)

 Possible projects with this shield:

  • Alarm clock
  • Standalone or PC data logger
  • Lab data acquisition system (Physics, Chemistry etc)
  • Weather station
  • Input or operating panel, like security panels or garage door opener
  • Handheld GPS
  • Morse code generator
  • The list goes on… 

Documentation:

Phi-1 shield documentation revision 11/19/2010

PCB design:

Schematic:

Fully assembled shield running clock:

 

PCB and parts:

Connector board design pictures:

Standard board breaks out connections from the RJ11 jack and 5V/GND. The prototype space has 5V/GND running down middle for convenience. You can make a TTL-RS232 circuit on it, or maybe power an opamp, add I2C A/D converter to it or else. The screw terminals are pretty convenient and their connections are brought out for prototyping. You can also simply plug it into a breadboard. It also has two LED indicators and has connections for X, Y, 5V and GND.

The relay board has a standard AC or DC relay with control signal coming through the RJ11 jack from the main board. Several screw terminals are included for wiring. A power jack is also included so that it can easily power a single piece of equipment with the relay. You can turn on and off an electromagnetor else light with it. 

This board passes the RJ11 connection to a 3.5mm stereo plug. It also has an LED indicator.

Assembling pictures:

Sample codes:

Clock display This is a basic program that displays the Clock. You can modify it to suit your needs.

Testing all functions This program tests everything, LCD, buttons, the clock, and EEPROM if you have one on board. Learn the basics of everything with this program.

Alarm clock (buzzer and LED) This program is a fully-functional alarm clock. You will find it more complex than the basic clock. If you can’t understand, try the Click display first.

Morse encoder This program allows you to type in a sentence in letters, numbers, and symbols. Then it plays it in Morse code. Use the arrow up and down to type letters (think old-school arcade game record) use left and right to move cursor. Use B to enter.

More to come!

I am coordinating an effort to have it made in a small quantity so it will be affordable. If I have one made, it will cost me around $30, but if I have more made, I could cut the cost down and possibly have it for $12. Leave me a message if you’re interested in getting one. I might be able to get my favorate electronics online store to sell these so you could buy the board along with all needed components in one purchase.



4 Responses to New Arduino shield – Phi-1

  1. Jeff says:

    Count me in for one.

  2. Jeff says:

    Very cool – and a good price, too. I’ll be buying one.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: